Three Areas that Increase Holiday Gift Basket Sales

by Shirley George Frazier on October 29, 2014

Gift Basket Business. Copyright Shirley George Frazier. All rights reserved.Are the companies that sell thousands of holiday gift baskets happy with their yearly profits? Yes and no.

Like you, they are pleased but not satisfied and always searching for additional methods to boost their income.

You can achieve this effort in many ways, especially through methods that have worked for you in the past.

Whether you’re new to the business or a seasoned veteran, the following options are a staple in your holiday sales foundation.

Phone calls.
Scared to pick up the phone to call potential buyers? That’s as good as saying, “I don’t want orders.”

Referrals.
People who order gift baskets are friends with other people who are gift basket buying candidates.

Professional connections.
Professionals you visit for various services need gift baskets for employees and clients.

If you’re not sure how to proceed, what to say, or how to address questions asked during conversations, a 30-minute phone call with me as part of your Golden Basket Club membership will solve that problem and complete sales quickly.

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How to Calm a Frustrated Gift Basket Buyer

by Shirley George Frazier on October 22, 2014

Gift Basket Business. Copyright Shirley George Frazier. All rights reserved.Most of your clients are going to be pleased with the gift baskets you design. One out of 100 will be upset. Why?

  • Your photo or description didn’t match the final result.
  • The gift basket wasn’t delivered on the agreed day or time.
  • There was a mix up regarding products, colors, or theme.

In all of my years in business, there has only been one major problem that was easily remedied. Still, for me, that was one problem too many.

How do you handle it?

  • You first uncover the exact problem, which isn’t always what you’re told.
  • You determine how to apologize, even if the situation wasn’t your fault.
  • Finally, you satisfy the client in whatever manner you choose and document the situation so it does not occur in the future.

This is your gift basket business, and with that, every problem feels as if it’s a personal blow to your reputation. That fact is true unless you handle the crisis immediately. In time, you will learn to separate your personal feelings from professional duties.

You can calm the client, salvage the situation, and learn from the experience so you’re wiser and stronger.

How do you overcome this challenge?

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Four Ways to Discard Old Gift Basket Inventory

October 15, 2014

Last year (or perhaps, in previous years) you bought items with great potential to be big sellers in gift baskets, but customers didn’t agree to include it in your custom designs. Now the products sit on shelves, waiting for the day you’ll make up your mind for its removal. You’re not alone in this misstep. [...]

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The Time to Start a Gift Basket Business is Now

October 8, 2014

Considering starting a gift basket business but want to wait until the New Year? That’s a good idea. However, you can also start your business this holiday season since there are lots of people who will be searching for the perfect gift to present or ship to family and friends who are in the area [...]

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What to Consider When Making Apology Gift Baskets

October 1, 2014

Businesses don’t need gift baskets only during good times. They also require your services for apology gift baskets when they inadvertently or blatantly treat a customer badly. If stories unfold online or in your local newspaper about businesses that practice bad customer service, introduce yourself to one of their top executives using any sales tool [...]

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Why Satisfaction is Part of Every Successful Gift Basket Business

September 24, 2014

My uncle, who past away many years ago, would promise to take me places he visited. These weren’t exotic locales in countries outside of the U.S. or even locations outside of the state in which we both lived. We were to visit flea markets and similar low-key places. I followed up on my end by [...]

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