What’s the best way to sell items the customers don’t want? Here are three ways to handle gift basket leftovers.

Your re-purpose strategy

After reading the definitive article on buying gift basket products, you make choices you hope will pay off. However, everything you buy to make solo gifts and complete gift baskets won’t be a hit with your clients.

That’s a shame, but true, especially if you’re new to this business. My suggestion is to realize that such a situation is inevitable.

Gift Basket Marketing, Vol. 1, by Shirley George Frazier. All rights reserved.

Every retailer has products in stock that sell slowly or are simply non-sellers. Clearance aisles prove that fact.

Parts of your inventory are going to be very popular (chocolates, cookies, beverages, cheeses, etc.), and other parts will flop. No one will want it.

All designers experience this. I certainly did.

However, as your business matures and you understand your clients’ preferences. You’ll make smarter buying decisions, your inventory will turn quicker (you’ll sell more of what you buy), and there will be less waste and misspent money.

That part of your success will come in time, so be patient.

Until then, prepare for:

  • Expired foods and goodies
  • Gifts that get dusty
  • Containers no one wants

Time to think “out of the basket”

It’s possible to turn those leftover items into sales opportunities. Doesn’t that sound like a better option than tossing it all in the trash?

To do so, you must get creative and see those misfit products as goods with potential to broaden your visibility. Here are examples.

  • Plush bears still available from Valentine’s Day need not wait until next year. Add it to your “I’m Beary Sorry” and “I Can’t Bear to Be Without You” gift baskets that men buy all year round.
  • Containers that are not selling can be sprayed, or ribbon can be added to it for a fresh look. Consider this vessel as part of a donation at a black tie auction or a charity where executives gather.
  • Goodies that will expire in one month are a “thank you for your business” tote bag gift for smaller firms that purchased from you once. They’ll eat it quickly while being reminded of your service.

More than three ways to handle gift basket leftovers

These three ideas are quick examples to clear space for gift basket items that sell fast, but there’s more. If you want superior methods that target big sales from large firms, you and I will map out your custom plan during a discussion that’s as short or long as you wish.

That’s when we uncover what you want to achieve so you get rid of leftovers the right way and never, ever waste money on such merchandise again.

What’s taking up space in your design studio right now that you wish you never bought? Which of the above ideas is your choice for money-making results?